Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

Italian Apartment Makes Micro Seem Huge

We’ve seen some pretty damn small apartments on this site. There was Felice Cohen’s 90 sq ft studio, Steve Sauer’s 183 sq ft triplex and countless tiny houses, the latter of which rarely break the 200 sq ft mark. But this 75 sq ft apartment in Rome might just take the prize for smallest home we’ve ever seen. The tiny space houses an actual kitchen, bathroom, dining area, a decent amount of storage and a loft for sleeping and lounging loft.

The space, which is minutes from the Pantheon and Saint Peter’s Square, dates from the 1700s. It was sitting fallow for years before architect Marco Pierazzi decided to buy and renovate it. He and his wife lived there before the birth of their child.

The space actually looks fairly livable. The kitchen is surprisingly functional looking. The stair/seat is very clever. The upstairs lounge looks quite cozy. The bed…well the bed might be a nightmare. Given that the opened bed covers the trap door that provides access to the rest of the space (see: bathroom), we wouldn’t want any late-night or early morning trips to the loo. Perhaps this is not an issue for those more gymnastically inclined and can hop over the railing.

While not a someplace I’d want to live in for a sustained period of time, the dinky space is a testament to the power of design, turning a space that most would consider only worthy of housing a dumpster into a pretty functional dwelling.

Via Business Insider

  • Marrena

    It’s pushing it for a two-person space, but that would be very livable for one person with a twin daybed. I definitely prefer the clever treatment of the stairs as bench as opposed to stairs as part of kitchen counter.

  • Christopher Tilley

    I think it’s a great space and something I could live in but the bed covering the trapdoor is a deal breaker for me.

    It might be possible to have something like a hammock for a bed that would leave the trapdoor accessible.

    • Peabody McKurk

      If you look closely at the photos, only the edge of the bed covers the door, wouldn’t be that difficult to push up the bed anyway.

      • gblock

        looks like if you can forgot a futon, a twin bed would be fine up there without blocking the access to the trap door (unless my depth perception is horribly off)

  • Christopher Tilley

    I think it’s a great space and something I could live in but the bed covering the trapdoor is a deal breaker for me.

    It might be possible to have something like a hammock for a bed that would leave the trapdoor accessible.

  • Peabody McKurk

    Love this, the walls are stunning! Great use of space, and design!

  • Jonathan

    Too small for me. Trapdoor being covered- how does that pass the fire code?

  • SubZERO23

    I love this space!! I usually sleep like a rock and don’t wake up at all, so that wouldn’t matter to me. It is pretty darn small, but my architecture firm and I have designed spaces (most admittedly still experimental) under 100 square feet, so it isn’t a life changing record in size.

    • SubZERO23

      By the way, it may sound like I’m criticizing the apartment for not being small enough, it’s definitely a brilliant use of space.

  • Ani

    Why don’t we just move into the coffins we’ll eventually inhabit? This is getting pretty nuts. I would imagine all those wealthy 1 percenters are chortling their heads off at this, from their spacious pre-war condos overlooking Central Park or their Hamptons abodes.