Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

Take a Very Brief Tour of 105 Sq Ft Apartment

In this short piece from CCTV, we see the interior of Genevieve Shuler’s 105 Sq Ft NYC apartment. Shuler pays $800 for the packed-to-the-gills West Village mico-unit. She has lived there for 8 years and apparently feels there’s more than enough space for her, evidenced by the fact she has a roommate: her cat Ruby.

The tour was part of CCTV’s coverage of the adAPT NYC competition. The segment included Senior Policy Analyst of the Citizen’s Housing and Planning Council (CHPCNY) Sarah Watson. Spearheaded by executive director Jerilyn Perine, CHPCNY was one of the main initiators of the adAPT NYC competition and is the city’s biggest advocate for small-space policy reform.

One of the biggest hurdles facing building small is policy reform. As the segment indicated, the smallest you can build in NYC is currently 400 sq ft. As we see with Shuler and many others, a person can live quite comfortably in far less space. Similarly, no more than 3 unrelated persons can occupy the same space legally (though this author can attest that that policy is seldom enforced). Tenant advocacy is very important but, as is the case in New York, policy is often out of step with tenant needs and advancements in building design.

While Shuler shows that people can–if necessary–live happily in super tiny apartments, we think the best is yet to come in small living; where micro units will be designed from the ground floor to optimize the living experience. San Francisco’s SmartSpace is a great example of that. Before that happens, policy reform will have to take place in many regions. The adAPt NYC competition and CHPCNY are making that look like a likely reality.

  • Pingback: Less is More | "Global Possibilities"()

  • shakti muse

    This is too small.
    400 sq.ft per person with really good design does work, and well. I think most of us that view this site have seen excellent examples.
    Older and/or disabled persons need ground floor design not climbing frames!
    I would like the mayor to live in one of these for 1 year. He seems to think it is a good idea, and adequate. Set the example and take the challenge.

  • di

    Rather than wash dishes in a shower, wash them in a basin on a counter top. Hang a camping shower bag on a hook above the basin to rinse the dishes.

  • di

    In a 10′ x 10′ area, try a 3′ x 6′ daybed. Store a weekly wardrobe in pull-out baskets beneath the bed.

    Try a 2′ x 4′ kitchenette. Include a 24″ standard-size, single-bowl sink, an under-counter 24″ combination washer/dryer and an over-counter 24″ tall fridge. For counter space, try a cutting board over the sink and a pull-out board between the washer/dryer and fridge. Use a portable stove top or crock pot.

    Store a set of pans and dry goods beneath the kitchen sink. Store dishes and glasses vertically on narrow shelving over the sink. Dry dishes on a kitchen towel on the pull-out board. Dry wet towels on hooks on the inside of the cabinet door under the sink.

    • di

      Use a cutting board or pull-out board as an ironing board, desk or to dine.

    • di

      Store utensils in a portable basket.

  • di

    Clutter, open and vertical storage is claustrophobic.

  • di

    Small 24″ under-counter kitchen appliances can be found online at Compact Appliance.

  • omordah

    On one hand I like the idea of smaller space, less stuff, (though in this case she has a lot of stuff.), but there is also a part of my brain screaming, fire trap.