Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

Live Life in Slomo

By all conventional and external standards, John Kitchin was a success. He had a thriving neurology practice, he had a big house, a V12 BMW, a Ferrari, lots of stuff, a wife, a son, an exotic animal farm. There was only one glitch: he was miserable, self-described “asshole,” working himself to the bones, supporting a level of affluence he was too busy to enjoy. When his deteriorating eyesight started to affect work, he saw an out. He did what most people would do in his position: he quit his practice, cashed in all of his chips, moved to San Diego and devoted his life to perfecting slow motion inline skating.

In this very worthwhile 16:29 minute mini-documentary, director Josh Izenberg chronicles Kitchin’s journey (he is now known as Slomo on the San Diego beach). Beyond mere flight of fancy, the 69 year old Kitchin describes his earnest quest for divinity. He describes how this quest is supported by neurological processes; the acceleration experienced during skating activates euphoric feelings in the brain–feelings he thought would eventually subside, but have persisted for the 15 years he’s been skating consistently.

While Kitchin’s path might strike some as obtuse, his message is clear and resonant: how we choose to live is our own. Reasons for not living the way we want to live are personal mythologies–stories that perpetuate our excuses–and are seldom rooted in any legitimate circumstance. This is not the dress rehearsal.

Via NY Times

Thanks for the tip Guillaume

  • John N. Robinson

    At 36, I unplugged from the corporate machine. At 43, I let go of all the lavish possessions. This is what freedom really feels like. I can’t wait to reach Slomo’s age to see what life is like then. Follow your freedom!

  • Badshot

    Cool old guy, doing what he wants

  • mxytsplyk

    I get the same sensation brisk-walking in the park. And I can’t recommend early retirement strongly enough.

  • tassonimeister .

    Thank you for sharing this story. I saw this documentary a few days ago, and haven’t stopped thinking about it since. I would love to see more anecdotes about people who have had less money/assets to start with, but have managed somehow to live life on their own terms. Is it possible? I think it is.

    • Paul

      Agreed – would like to see this website highlighting more people like this guy that changed their life and started doing what they wanted to do. Very inspirational.

  • nickredd

    The high 5’s at the very end was my favorite part! Good for you SloMo. An inspiration.

  • Grateful!

    Now I understand why I love glide sports! Biking, skiing, sailing and rollerblading – it makes sense now.

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  • Alexander López

    It’s easy to do what you really want once you’ve earned all the money you need for getting out of the system. What about a documentary about YOUNG, recently graduated people who doesn’t earn a fortune but want live wholesome lives before losing hair?

  • Gm.

    [Finally was able to copy and paste.] Wonderful story/lesson on Slomo. Really enjoyed it. Also, I was taken by your presentation of this story and its lesson. You wrote,

    “how we choose to live is our own. Reasons for not living the way we want to live are personal mythologies–stories that perpetuate our excuses–and are seldom rooted in any legitimate circumstance. This is not the dress rehearsal.”

    This is powerful language, and I love it. Thank you for all this.

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  • Jefferson

    I’m glad the video was summarized the way it was: we must all choose the life we want to live. The trick is figuring out what brings real happiness. One obviously can’t advocate Slomo’s current lifestyle to all according to Kant’s Categorical Imperative. Society would collapse because nobody would be producing any social value other than entertainment. I know many busy physicians who have a well balanced life and who are extremely satisfied and internally at peace. I believe that true happiness comes from balancing one’s life between peaceful moments of personal enrichment and ambitious service to others. My personal example is the life of Jesus Christ.

  • AA2theron

    But, some people really learnto love their pile of shit!