Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.

An Attic You Wouldn’t Mind Being Trapped In

With their sloping roofs and associations with housing unwanted family members, the poor attic has a hard time being recognized as a legitimate place to live. This situation makes Italian architect Michele Gambato’s attic conversion in Padua all the more impressive (full disclosure: it’s a top-floor apartment). Gambato actually made the 258 sq ft space seem pretty livable.

Gambato wanted to divide the tiny space into discreet kitchen, dining, living and sleeping zones. He blocked out the open space using cabintry along the perimeter as well as interior of the space.

michele-gambato-floorplan

The center storage volume houses a trundle bed which can be used as a sofa or bed depending on how far it is extended. Like Anthony Gill’s family apartment, Gambato takes advantage of the volume where the bed is stored, using it as a dining platform, whose height makes it easier to look out the flat’s lone window. All the cabinets are white-washed plywood and the floor is concrete, giving the space a light and open feel. Perhaps if this Gambato had visited the Bates’ household back in the day, things wouldn’t have ended up so poorly.

Thanks for the tip Andrei

Images courtesy of Michele Gambato

  • Great use of the space, love all the storage and natural light.